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J Cell Mol Med. 2009 Jan;13(1):87-102. doi: 10.1111/j.1582-4934.2008.00598.x.

Endothelial progenitor cells: identity defined?

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Chemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, University of Ghent, University Hospital Ghent, De Pintelaan, Ghent, Belgium.

Abstract

In the past decade, researchers have gained important insights on the role of bone marrow (BM)-derived cells in adult neovascularization. A subset of BM-derived cells, called endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), has been of particular interest, as these cells were suggested to home to sites of neovascularization and neoendothelialization and differentiate into endothelial cells (ECs) in situ, a process referred to as postnatal vasculogenesis. Therefore, EPCs were proposed as a potential regenerative tool for treating human vascular disease and a possible target to restrict vessel growth in tumour pathology. However, conflicting results have been reported in the field, and the identification, characterization, and exact role of EPCs in vascular biology is still a subject of much discussion. The focus of this review is on the controversial issues in the field of EPCs which are related to the lack of a unique EPC marker, identification challenges related to the paucity of EPCs in the circulation, and the important phenotypical and functional overlap between EPCs, haematopoietic cells and mature ECs. We also discuss our recent findings on the origin of endothelial outgrowth cells (EOCs), showing that this in vitro defined EC population does not originate from circulating CD133(+) cells or CD45(+) haematopoietic cells.

PMID:
19067770
PMCID:
PMC3823038
DOI:
10.1111/j.1582-4934.2008.00598.x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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