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J Vis Exp. 2008 Feb 25;(12). pii: 678. doi: 10.3791/678.

A method for 2-photon imaging of blood flow in the neocortex through a cranial window.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, University of California, Los Angeles, USA. mostany@ucla.edu

Abstract

The ability to image the cerebral vasculature (from large vessels to capillaries) and record blood flow dynamics in the intact brain of living rodents is a powerful technique. Using in vivo 2-photon microscopy through a cranial window it is possible to image fluorescent dyes injected intravenously. This permits one to image the cortical vasculature and also to obtain measurements of blood flow. This technique was originally developed by David Kleinfeld and Winfried Denk. The method can be used to study blood flow dynamics during or after cerebral ischemia, in neurodegenerative disorders, in brain tumors, or in normal brain physiology. For example, it has been used to study how stroke causes shifts in blood flow direction and changes in red blood cell velocity or flux in and around the infarct. Here we demonstrate how to use 2-photon microscopy to image blood flow dynamics in the neocortex of living mice using fluorescent dyes injected into the tail vein.

PMID:
19066563
PMCID:
PMC2582841
DOI:
10.3791/678
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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