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J Vis Exp. 2008 Feb 15;(12). pii: 680. doi: 10.3791/680.

A craniotomy surgery procedure for chronic brain imaging.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, University of California, Los Angeles, USA. mostany@ucla.edu

Abstract

Imaging techniques are becoming increasingly important in the study brain function. Among them, two-photon laser scanning microscopy has emerged as an extremely useful method, because it allows the study of the live intact brain. With appropriate preparations, this technique allows the observation of the same cortical area chronically, from minutes to months. In this video, we show a preparation for chronic in vivo imaging of the brain using two-photon microscopy. This technique was initially pioneered by Dr. Karel Svoboda, who is now a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator at Janelia Farm. Preparations like the one shown here can be used for imaging of neocortical structure (e.g., dendritic and axonal dynamics), to record neuronal activity using calcium-sensitive dyes, to image cortical blood flow dynamics, or for intrinsic optical imaging studies. Deep imaging of the neocortex is possible with optimal cranial window surgeries. Operating under the most sterile conditions possible to avoid infections, together with using extreme care to do not damage the dura mater during the surgery, will result in successful and long-lasting glass-covered cranial windows.

PMID:
19066562
PMCID:
PMC2582844
DOI:
10.3791/680
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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