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J Vis Exp. 2008 Nov 10;(21). pii: 960. doi: 10.3791/960.

A technique for serial collection of cerebrospinal fluid from the cisterna magna in mouse.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology, Columbia University, USA.

Abstract

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that is pathologically characterized by extracellular deposition of beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta) and intraneuronal accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau protein. Because cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is in direct contact with the extracellular space of the brain, it provides a reflection of the biochemical changes in the brain in response to pathological processes. CSF from AD patients shows a decrease in the 42 amino-acid form of Abeta (Abeta42), and increases in total tau and hyperphosphorylated tau, though the mechanisms responsible for these changes are still not fully understood. Transgenic (Tg) mouse models of AD provide an excellent opportunity to investigate how and why Abeta or tau levels in CSF change as the disease progresses. Here, we demonstrate a refined cisterna magna puncture technique for CSF sampling from the mouse. This extremely gentle sampling technique allows serial CSF samples to be obtained from the same mouse at 2-3 month intervals which greatly minimizes the confounding effect of between-mouse variability in Abeta or tau levels, making it possible to detect subtle alterations over time. In combination with Abeta and tau ELISA, this technique will be useful for studies designed to investigate the relationship between the levels of CSF Abeta42 and tau, and their metabolism in the brain in AD mouse models. Studies in Tg mice could provide important validation as to the potential of CSF Abeta or tau levels to be used as biological markers for monitoring disease progression, and to monitor the effect of therapeutic interventions. As the mice can be sacrificed and the brains can be examined for biochemical or histological changes, the mechanisms underlying the CSF changes can be better assessed. These data are likely to be informative for interpretation of human AD CSF changes.

PMID:
19066529
PMCID:
PMC2762909
DOI:
10.3791/960
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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