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Public Health Nutr. 2009 Sep;12(9):1392-8. doi: 10.1017/S1368980008004096. Epub 2008 Dec 9.

Dietary fibre intake of pregnant women attending general practices in southern Brazil--the ECCAGE Study.

Author information

1
Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Graduate Studies Program in Epidemiology, UFRGS/Departamento de Medicina Social/PPG-Epidemiologia, Rua Ramiro Barcelos, Porto Alegre, Brazil. caroline.buss@ufrgs.br

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Increase in fibre intake during pregnancy may reduce weight gain, glucose intolerance, dyslipidaemia, pre-eclampsia and constipation. Few studies have evaluated adequacy of fibre intake during pregnancy.

OBJECTIVE:

To assess, through an FFQ, the dietary fibre intake of pregnant women receiving prenatal care from general public practices and compare it with current guidelines.

DESIGN AND SETTING:

Cross-sectional analyses of a pregnancy cohort study (ECCAGE-Study of Food Intake and Eating Behaviour in Pregnancy) conducted in eighteen general practices in southern Brazil, from June 2006 to April 2007.

SUBJECTS:

Five hundred and seventy-eight pregnant women with mean (SD) age of 24.9 (6.5) years and mean gestational age of 24.5 (5.8) weeks.

RESULTS:

The mean energy intake was 11 615 kJ/d (2776 kcal/d). The mean total fibre intake (30.2 g/d) was slightly above the recommended value of 28 g/d (P < 0.001), yet 50% (95% CI 46, 54) of the women failed to meet the recommendation. Whole-grain fibre constituted only 1% of total fibre intake in the cereal group. In adjusted Poisson regression analyses, not meeting the recommendation for fibre intake was associated with alcohol intake (prevalence ratio 1.29; 95% CI 1.11, 1.50) and absence of nutritional guidance (prevalence ratio 1.22; 95% CI 1.05, 1.42) during pregnancy.

CONCLUSIONS:

About half of the pregnant women failed to meet the recommended fibre intake, especially those not reporting nutritional guidance during pregnancy. For most women, whole-grain cereal intake was absent or trivial. Taken together, our data indicate the need, at least in this setting, for greater nutritional education in prenatal care.

PMID:
19063767
DOI:
10.1017/S1368980008004096
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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