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Ann Behav Med. 2008 Dec;36(3):244-52. doi: 10.1007/s12160-008-9071-6. Epub 2008 Dec 5.

Predicting the physical activity intention-behavior profiles of adopters and maintainers using three social cognition models.

Author information

1
Behavioural Medicine Laboratory, Faculty of Education, University of Victoria, BC, Canada. rhodes@uvic.ca

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Most of the population have positive intentions to engage in physical activity (PA) but fail to act; thus, the need to understand successful translation of intention into behavior is warranted in order to focus intervention efforts.

PURPOSE:

The objective of the study is to examine constructs of the transtheoretical model, theory of planned behavior, and protection motivation theory as predictors of physical activity intention-behavior profiles across 6 months in a Canadian workplace sample.

METHODS:

Employees from three large organizations in the province of Alberta (n = 887) completed a baseline survey relating to their demographic and medical background, PA, and social-cognitive constructs. A total of 611 participants completed a second assessment 6 months later.

RESULTS:

Participants were grouped by five profiles: nonintenders, unsuccessful adopters, successful adopters, unsuccessful maintainers, and successful maintainers. Perceived importance and concern for PA (cognitive processes, instrumental attitude, perceived severity) distinguished nonintenders from the other four profiles, self-management and self-regulation of the behavior (behavioral processes, self-efficacy) distinguished successful adopters from unsuccessful adopters, while control over constraints (cons, perceived control, self-efficacy) were the key discriminators of successful maintainers from unsuccessful maintainers.

CONCLUSION:

The results provide useful information for intervention campaigns and demonstrate a need to consider adoption and maintenance profiles.

PMID:
19057976
DOI:
10.1007/s12160-008-9071-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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