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Mol Cell Proteomics. 2009 Apr;8(4):670-80. doi: 10.1074/mcp.M800070-MCP200. Epub 2008 Dec 2.

Global analysis of protein damage by the lipid electrophile 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal.

Author information

1
Department of Biochemistry, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee 37232, USA.

Abstract

Lipid peroxidation yields a variety of electrophiles, which are thought to contribute to the molecular pathogenesis of diseases involving oxidative stress, yet little is known of the scope of protein damage caused by lipid electrophiles. We identified protein targets of the prototypical lipid electrophile 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) in RKO cells treated with 50 or 100 mum HNE. HNE Michael adducts were biotinylated by reaction with biotinamidohexanoic acid hydrazide, captured with streptavidin, and the captured proteins were resolved by one dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, digested with trypsin, and identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Of the 1500+ proteins identified, 417 displayed a statistically significant increase in adduction with increasing HNE exposure concentration. We further identified 18 biotin hydrazide-modified, HNE-adducted peptides by specific capture using anti-biotin antibody and analysis by high resolution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. A subset of the identified HNE targets were validated with a streptavidin capture and immunoblotting approach, which enabled detection of adducts at HNE exposures as low as 1 mum. Protein interaction network analysis indicated several subsystems impacted by endogenous electrophiles in oxidative stress, including the 26 S proteasomal and chaperonin containing TCP-1 (CCT) systems involved in protein-folding and degradation, as well as the COP9 signalosome, translation initiation complex, and a large network of ribonucleoproteins. Global analyses of protein lipid electrophile adducts provide a systems-level perspective on the mechanisms of diseases involving oxidative stress.

PMID:
19054759
PMCID:
PMC2667350
DOI:
10.1074/mcp.M800070-MCP200
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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