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J Laryngol Otol. 2009 Jan;123(1):e3. doi: 10.1017/S0022215108004180. Epub 2008 Dec 2.

Unusual location for Castleman's disease.

Author information

1
Department of Otolaryngology, Doncaster Royal Infirmary, UK. docghrao@gmail.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We present the first reported case of persistent, posterior triangle lymphadenopathy in a child, caused by Castleman's disease.

CASE REPORT:

A seven-year-old boy presented with a painless swelling in the posterior triangle of his left neck, with no compression of the surrounding structures. A histological diagnosis of Castleman's disease was made. Eventual treatment was by complete excision. At six-month follow up, there were no signs of recurrence.

CONCLUSION:

The causes of persistent cervical lymphadenopathy in children are many. Most are not significant, but some are life-threatening. Castleman's disease should be considered as a possible diagnosis in persistent childhood lymphadenopathy.

PMID:
19046470
DOI:
10.1017/S0022215108004180
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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