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Int J Parasitol. 2009 Apr;39(5):625-33. doi: 10.1016/j.ijpara.2008.10.012. Epub 2008 Nov 17.

Nanobodies, a promising tool for species-specific diagnosis of Taenia solium cysticercosis.

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1
Animal Health Department, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nationalestraat 155, B-2000 Antwerp, Belgium. ndeckers@itg.be

Abstract

Taenia solium cysticercosis is a major helminth zoonosis in developing countries. Pigs are the intermediate hosts mediating transmission of infection. Specific assays to diagnose living cysts in pigs are lacking. The monoclonal-based antigen detection ELISA is genus-specific and cross-reactions with Taenia hydatigena hamper the use of this test to screen pigs. We, therefore, aimed to introduce nanobodies, camelid-derived single-domain antibodies specific for T. solium cysticercosis, to develop unambiguous tests. Nanobodies were cloned following immunization of two dromedaries with T. solium antigen and eight T. solium-specific nanobodies were selected after phage display. Their binding characteristics and potential for the diagnosis of porcine cysticercosis were investigated. The nanobodies do not cross-react with T. hydatigena, Taenia saginata, Taenia crassiceps or Trichinella spiralis and were categorized into four epitope-binding groups. The target protein was identified as 14kDa diagnostic glycoprotein (Ts14), but the nanobodies also reacted with other proteins of the same family. Nanobodies were tested in a sandwich ELISA with cyst fluid, and one particular nanobody detected its cognate serum antigens in a species-specific inhibition ELISA. Considering their beneficial production and stability properties, these highly specific nanobodies constitute a promising tool to diagnose cysticercosis after further improvement of the sensitivity and future assay validation.

PMID:
19041315
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijpara.2008.10.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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