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Eur J Radiol. 2010 Jan;73(1):143-7. doi: 10.1016/j.ejrad.2008.10.003. Epub 2008 Nov 28.

Patient acceptance of MR colonography with improved fecal tagging versus conventional colonoscopy.

Author information

1
Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Department of Surgical Gastroenterology D, Copenhagen University Hospital Herlev, Herlev Ringvej, DK-2730 Herlev, Denmark. achiam1@dadlnet.dk

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Conventional colonoscopy (CC) is the gold standard for colonic examinations. However, patient acceptance is not high. Patient acceptance is influenced by several factors, notably anticipation and experience. This has led to the assumption that patient acceptance would be higher in non-invasive examinations such as MR/CT colonography (MRC/CTC) and perhaps even higher without bowel preparation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate patient acceptance of MRC with fecal tagging versus CC.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

In a 14-month period, all patients first-time referred to our department for CC were asked to participate in the study. Two days prior to MRC, patients ingested an oral contrast mixture (barium/ferumoxsil) together with four meals each day. Standard bowel purgation was performed before CC. Before and after MRC and CC a number of questions were addressed.

RESULTS:

Sixty-four (34 men, 30 women) patients referred for CC participated in the study. 27% had some discomfort ingesting the contrast mixture, and 49% had some discomfort with the bowel purgation. As a future colonic examination preference, 71% preferred MRC, 13% preferred CC and 15% had no preference. If MRC was to be performed with bowel purgation, 75% would prefer MRC, 12% would prefer CC and 12% had no preference.

CONCLUSION:

This study shows that there is a potential gain in patient acceptance by using MRC for colonic examination, since MRC is considered less painful and less unpleasant than CC. In addition, the results indicate that patients in this study prefer fecal tagging instead of bowel purgation.

PMID:
19041207
DOI:
10.1016/j.ejrad.2008.10.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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