Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2009 Mar 1;29(5):470-80. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2036.2008.03901.x. Epub 2008 Nov 25.

Systematic review: the epidemiology of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in primary care, using the UK General Practice Research Database.

Author information

1
Michael E DeBakey Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA. hasheme@bcm.tmc.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common diagnosis in primary care; however, there has been no comprehensive review of the epidemiology of GERD in this setting.

AIM:

To review systematically articles that used the General Practice Research Database to study the epidemiology of GERD.

METHODS:

Systematic literature searches.

RESULTS:

Seventeen articles fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The incidence of GERD in primary care was 4.5 new diagnoses per 1000 person-years in 1996 (95% CI: 4.4-4.7). A new diagnosis of GERD was associated with being overweight, obese or an ex-smoker. Prior diagnoses of ischaemic heart disease, peptic ulcer disease, nonspecific chest pain, nonspecific abdominal pain, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma were associated with a subsequent new GERD diagnosis. A first diagnosis of GERD was associated with an increased risk of a subsequent diagnosis of oesophageal adenocarcinoma, oesophageal stricture, chronic cough, sinusitis, chest pain, angina, gallbladder disease, irritable bowel syndrome or sleep problems. Mortality may be higher in patients with a GERD diagnosis than in those without in the first year after diagnosis, but not long term.

CONCLUSION:

The General Practice Research Database is an effective way of studying the epidemiology of GERD in a large population-based primary care setting.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Wiley
    Loading ...
    Support Center