Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2009 Apr;203(3):519-27. doi: 10.1007/s00213-008-1398-y. Epub 2008 Nov 20.

Decision making as a predictor of first ecstasy use: a prospective study.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry-PB 0.429, Amsterdam Institute for Addiction Research Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, PO Box 75867, 1070 AW Amsterdam, The Netherlands. t.schilt@amc.uva.nl

Abstract

RATIONALE:

Ecstasy (+/-3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine) is a widely used recreational drug that may damage the serotonin system and may entail neuropsychological dysfunctions. Few studies investigated predictors for ecstasy use. Self-reported impulsivity does not predict the initiation of ecstasy use; the question is if neuropsychological indicators of impulsivity can predict first ecstasy use.

OBJECTIVE:

This study tested the hypothesis that a neuropsychological indicator of impulsivity predicts initiation of ecstasy use.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Decision-making strategy and decision-making reaction times were examined with the Iowa Gambling Task in 149 ecstasy-naive subjects. The performance of 59 subjects who initiated ecstasy use during a mean follow-up period of 18 months (range, 11-26) was compared with the performance of 90 subjects that remained ecstasy-naive.

RESULTS:

Significant differences in decision-making strategy between female future ecstasy users and female persistent ecstasy-naive subjects were found. In addition, the gap between decision-making reaction time after advantageous choices and reaction time after disadvantageous choices was smaller in future ecstasy users than in persistent ecstasy-naives.

CONCLUSION:

Decision-making strategy on a gambling task was predictive for future use of ecstasy in female subjects. Differences in decision-making time between future ecstasy users and persistent ecstasy-naives may point to lower punishment sensitivity or higher impulsivity in future ecstasy users. Because differences were small, the clinical relevance is questionable.

PMID:
19020868
PMCID:
PMC2761546
DOI:
10.1007/s00213-008-1398-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Springer Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center