Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Eur J Appl Physiol. 2009 Feb;105(3):453-61. doi: 10.1007/s00421-008-0923-3. Epub 2008 Nov 19.

Core temperature differences between males and females during intermittent exercise: physical considerations.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Human Bioenergetics and Environmental Physiology, School of Human Kinetics, University of Ottawa, 125 University Pvt, Ottawa, ON, Canada.

Abstract

We examined differences in dynamic heat balance between males and females during intermittent exercise. Six males (M) and six females (F) performed three 30-min bouts of exercise (Ex1, Ex2, Ex3) at a constant rate of metabolic heat production (M - W) of approximately 500 W separated by three 15-min periods of inactive recovery. Rate of total heat loss (M - W) was measured by direct calorimetry, while M - W was determined by indirect calorimetry. Esophageal (T (es)) was measured continuously. Exercise at a constant M - W of approximately 500 W, was paralleled by a similar HL between sexes at the end of Ex1 (M: 462 +/- 30 W, F: 442 +/- 9 W, p = 0.117), Ex2 (M: 468 +/- 28 W, F: 508 +/- 18 W, p = 0.343), and Ex3 (M: 469 +/- 17 W, F: 465 +/- 13 W, p = 0.657). Consequently, changes in body heat content were comparable after Ex1 (M: 218 +/- 21 kJ, F: 287 +/- 35 kJ, p = 0.134), Ex2 (M: 109 +/- 18 kJ, F: 158 +/- 29 kJ, p = 0.179), and Ex3 (M: 92 +/- 19 kJ, F: 156 +/- 35 kJ, p = 0.136). However, females had greater overall increases in T (es) at the end of Ex3 (M: 0.55 +/- 0.25 degrees C, F: 0.97 +/- 0.26 degrees C, p <OR= 0.05). Differences in core temperature between sexes appear to be solely related to differences in physical characteristics, and not due to concurrent differences in whole-body thermoregulatory responses.

PMID:
19018561
DOI:
10.1007/s00421-008-0923-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center