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Am J Health Promot. 2008 Nov-Dec;23(2):92-6. doi: 10.4278/ajhp.07040533.

Brief multiple behavior health interventions for older adolescents.

Author information

1
Addictive & Health Behaviors Research Institute, Department of Health Education & Behavior, University of Florida, 7800 Belfort Parkway, Suite 270, Jacksonville, FL 32256, USA. cwerch@hhp.ufl.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This study examined whether brief intervention strategies founded on the Behavior-Image Model and addressing positive images of college and career success could be potentially efficacious in impacting multiple health habits of high-risk adolescents transitioning into adulthood.

DESIGN:

Participants were stratified by grade level and drug use and individually randomized to one of the three Plan for Success interventions, with baseline and 1 month postintervention data collections.

SETTING:

A large, relatively diverse suburban school in northeast Florida.

SUBJECTS:

A total of 375 11th and 12th grade students participated during the spring semester 2006.

INTERVENTION:

Three interventions studied included: (1) Goal Survey, (2) Goal Survey plus Contract, or (3) Goal Survey plus Consult.

MEASURES:

Outcome measures included multiple health risk, health promotion, and personal development behaviors, as well as image and belief measures.

ANALYSIS:

Repeated-measures MANOVAs and ANOVAs were used to examine intervention effects.

RESULTS:

MANOVAs were significant for alcohol use, F(4,328) = 6.33, p = .001; marijuana use, F(4,317) = 3.72, p = .01; exercise, F(3,299 = 4.28, p = .01; college preparation, F(2,327) = 6.26, p = .001; and career preparation, F(2,329) = 6.17, p = .001, with most behaviors improving over time, whereas group-by-time interaction effects were found for nutrition habits, F(6,652) = 2.60, p = .02; and career preparation, F(4,658) = 3.26, p = .01, favoring the consultation.

CONCLUSION:

Brief interventions founded on the Behavior-Image Model may have potential to improve selected health and personal development habits among older adolescents.

PMID:
19004157
PMCID:
PMC2898909
DOI:
10.4278/ajhp.07040533
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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