Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Psychon Bull Rev. 2008 Dec;15(6):1148-53. doi: 10.3758/PBR.15.6.1148.

Testing whether gaze cues and arrow cues produce reflexive or volitional shifts of attention.

Author information

1
University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. sara.stevens@utoronto.ca

Abstract

It has been suggested that two types of uninformative central cues produce reflexive orienting: gaze and arrow cues. Using the criterion that voluntary shifts of attention facilitate both response speed and perceptual accuracy, whereas reflexive shifts of attention facilitate only response speed (Prinzmetal, McCool, & Park, 2005), we tested whether these cues produce reflexive or volitional shifts of attention. A cued letter discrimination task was used with both gaze (Experiments 1A and 1B) and arrow (Experiments 2A and 2B) cues, in which participants responded to the identity of the target letter. In the response time (respond speed) tasks, participants were asked to respond as quickly as possible to the target; in the accuracy (perceptual quality) tasks, participants were asked to respond as accurately as possible. For both cue types, compatible cues were found to facilitate response speed but not perceptual accuracy, indicating that both gaze and arrow cues generate reflexive shifts in attention.

PMID:
19001582
DOI:
10.3758/PBR.15.6.1148
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Loading ...
Support Center