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Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Nov;88(5):1256-62.

Using cereal to increase dietary fiber intake to the recommended level and the effect of fiber on bowel function in healthy persons consuming North American diets.

Author information

1
Clinical Nutrition & Risk Factor Modification Center, St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Canada. v.vuksan@utoronto.ca

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Dietary fiber intake remains low despite increasing evidence for its health benefits, including laxation.

OBJECTIVE:

We aimed to assess the effects of increasing fiber intake on bowel habits and gastrointestinal tolerance in healthy persons consuming a typical Canadian or US diet.

DESIGN:

Under a randomized crossover design, 23 free-living participants consumed a typical Canadian or US diet (35% fat, 12 g fiber/d) and received 25.0-28.7 g fiber/d from each of 5 breakfast cereals: All-Bran (AB), Bran Buds with Corn (BBC), Bran Buds with Psyllium (BBP), BBC with viscous fiber blend (VFB), or a low-fiber control for 3 wk, with each study arm separated by a washout of >/=1 wk. Seven-day stool collections and a symptom diary were obtained during the last week of each study arm.

RESULTS:

All study cereals induced significant (P < 0.05) increases in fecal bulk from the control diet at 128 +/- 38 g to 199 +/- 56, 199 +/- 57, 247 +/- 87, and 197 +/- 63 g with consumption of AB, BBC, BBP, and VFB, respectively; less intestinal transit time; and significantly (P < 0.05) greater bowel movement frequency. Despite the increased activity of the bowel, a positive level of comfort was maintained. BBP was more effective than other cereals in terms of increasing fecal wet weight (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSION:

Water-insoluble dietary fibers (ie, AB and BBC) and their mixtures with water-soluble fibers (ie, BBP and VFB) in the form of breakfast cereals (2.5 servings/d) proved to be a practical way of increasing fiber intake to recommended levels, while maintaining a good level of tolerance.

PMID:
18996860
DOI:
10.3945/ajcn.2008.25956
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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