Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Emerg Med. 2011 Jun;40(6):696-703. doi: 10.1016/j.jemermed.2008.04.043. Epub 2008 Nov 7.

Intimate partner violence perpetration among men and emergency department use.

Author information

1
Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control, University of Texas School of Public Health, Dallas Regional Campus, Dallas, Texas, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetration and emergency department (ED) use share common risk factors, such as risk-taking behaviors, but little is known about the relationship between IPV perpetration and ED use or the effect of risk-taking on this relationship.

STUDY OBJECTIVES:

This study examined the relationship between IPV perpetration, risk-taking, and ED utilization among men in the general U.S. population.

METHODS:

This cross-sectional study utilized data from the 2002 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, focusing on non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, and Hispanic male respondents 18-49 years of age cohabiting with a spouse or partner. Logistic regression was used to calculate adjusted odds ratios (AOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI).

RESULTS:

Approximately 38% of IPV perpetrators reported ED use in the previous year, compared to 24% of non-perpetrators. Several risk-taking factors (e.g., perception of risk-taking, transportation-related risk-taking, and aggression-related arrest), alcohol and illicit drug use and abuse or dependence, and serious mental illness were positively associated with IPV perpetration. Men reporting IPV were 1.5 times (AOR 1.47, 95% CI 1.01-2.13) more likely than non-perpetrators to utilize the ED, after taking all factors into account. Drug abuse or dependence, transportation-related risk behaviors, and serious mental illness also were independently associated with ED use.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results indicate that men who perpetrate IPV are more likely than non-perpetrators to use ED services. These findings suggest that screening for IPV, as well as risk-taking and mental illness among men accessing ED services may increase opportunities for intervention and referral.

PMID:
18993018
PMCID:
PMC3040786
DOI:
10.1016/j.jemermed.2008.04.043
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center