Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2008 Nov;93(11 Suppl 1):S57-63. doi: 10.1210/jc.2008-1585.

Role of body fat distribution and the metabolic complications of obesity.

Author information

1
Endocrine Research Unit, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA. jensen@mayo.edu

Abstract

CONTEXT:

An upper body/visceral fat distribution in obesity is closely linked with metabolic complications, whereas increased lower body fat is independently predictive of reduced cardiovascular risk.

EVIDENCE ACQUISITION:

The measured functions of different fat depots with regards to fatty acid storage and release in health and obesity were reviewed. The adverse effects of experimentally increasing free fatty acid (FFA) concentrations on liver, muscle, pancreatic beta-cell, and endothelial function were noted.

EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS:

The most dramatic abnormality in FFA metabolism is failure to suppress FFA concentrations/adipose tissue lipolysis normally in response to postprandial hyperinsulinemia. Upper body sc fat delivers the majority of FFA to the systemic circulation under postabsorptive and postprandial conditions. In upper body obesity, portal FFA concentrations resulting from both systemic and visceral adipose tissue lipolysis may be significantly greater than arterial FFA concentrations, exposing the liver to even greater amounts of FFA. Visceral fat also releases sufficient IL-6 to increase portal vein IL-6 concentrations, which can affect hepatic metabolism as well.

CONCLUSIONS:

Lower body, upper body sc, and visceral fat depots have unique characteristics with regards to fatty acid metabolism. Selective dysregulation of these depots probably plays an important role with the metabolic complications of obesity.

PMID:
18987271
PMCID:
PMC2585758
DOI:
10.1210/jc.2008-1585
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Silverchair Information Systems Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center