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Neurosurgery. 2008 Oct;63(4):662-74; discussion 674-5. doi: 10.1227/01.NEU.0000325497.79690.4C.

Clinical and angiographic outcome after endovascular management of giant intracranial aneurysms.

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1
Department of Neurosurgery, Millard Fillmore Gates Hospital, Kaleida Health, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14209, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Giant (>or=25 mm) intracranial aneurysms (IA) have an extremely poor natural history and continue to confound modern techniques for management. Currently, there is a dearth of large series examining endovascular treatment of giant IAs only.

METHODS:

We reviewed long-term clinical and radiological outcome from a series of 39 consecutive giant IAs treated with endovascular repair in 38 patients at 2 tertiary referral centers. Data were evaluated in 3 ways: on a per-treatment session basis for each aneurysm, at 30 days after each patient's final treatment, and at the last known follow-up examination.

RESULTS:

Ten (26%) aneurysms were ruptured. At the last angiographic follow-up examination (21.5 +/- 22.9 months), 95% or higher and 100% occlusion rates were documented in 64 and 36% of aneurysms, respectively, with parent vessel preservation maintained in 74%. Stents were required in 25 aneurysms. Twenty percent of treatment sessions resulted in permanent morbidity, and death within 30 days occurred after 8% of treatment sessions. On average, 1.9 +/- 1.1 sessions were required to treat each aneurysm, with a resulting cumulative per-patient mortality of 16% and morbidity of 32%. At the last known clinical follow-up examination (mean, 24.8 +/- 24.8 months), 24 (63%) patients had Glasgow Outcome Scale scores of 4 or 5 ("good" or "excellent"), 10 patients had worsened neurological function from baseline (26% morbidity), and 11 had died (29% mortality).

CONCLUSION:

We present what is to our knowledge the largest series to date evaluating outcome after consecutive giant IAs treated with endovascular repair. Giant IAs carry a high risk for surgical or endovascular intervention. We hope critical and honest evaluation of treatment results will ensure continued improvement in patient care.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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