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Obesity (Silver Spring). 2008 Nov;16 Suppl 2:S75-9. doi: 10.1038/oby.2008.450.

Self-reported stigmatization among candidates for bariatric surgery.

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1
Department of Psychiatry, Center for Weight and Eating Disorders, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. dsarwer@mail.med.upenn.edu

Abstract

The popularity of bariatric surgery has increased the focus on the psychological aspects of extreme obesity. Although a growing literature has documented the psychosocial burden associated with extreme obesity, surprisingly little attention has been paid to the experience of weight-related stigmatization among extremely obese individuals. The present study investigated self-reported experiences of weight-related stigmatization, weight-related quality of life, and depressive symptoms among 117 extremely obese individuals (BMI = 48.2 +/- 7.5 kg/m2) who presented for bariatric surgery at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. In general, these individuals reported infrequent weight-related stigma, which was unrelated to BMI. Some specific forms of stigmatization, however, appear to be related to body size. The occurrence of stigmatization was associated with poorer weight-related quality of life and greater symptoms of depression.

PMID:
18978767
DOI:
10.1038/oby.2008.450
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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