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J Clin Exp Neuropsychol. 2009 Jul;31(5):594-604. doi: 10.1080/13803390802372125. Epub 2008 Oct 29.

Does familiarity with computers affect computerized neuropsychological test performance?

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. giverson@interchange.ubc.ca

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine whether self-reported computer familiarity is related to performance on computerized neurocognitive testing. Participants were 130 healthy adults who self-reported whether their computer use was "some" (n = 65) or "frequent" (n = 65). The two groups were individually matched on age, education, sex, and race. All completed the CNS Vital Signs (Gualtieri & Johnson, 2006b) computerized neurocognitive battery. There were significant differences on 6 of the 23 scores, including scores derived from the Symbol-Digit Coding Test, Stroop Test, and the Shifting Attention Test. The two groups were also significantly different on the Psychomotor Speed (Cohen's d = 0.37), Reaction Time (d = 0.68), Complex Attention (d = 0.40), and Cognitive Flexibility (d = 0.64) domain scores. People with "frequent" computer use performed better than people with "some" computer use on some tests requiring rapid visual scanning and keyboard work.

PMID:
18972312
DOI:
10.1080/13803390802372125
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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