Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Pediatr Emerg Care. 2008 Nov;24(11):749-56. doi: 10.1097/PEC.0b013e31818c2665.

Effect of cervical spine immobilization technique on pediatric advanced airway management: a high-fidelity infant simulation model.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. nishisaki@email.chop.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Current guidelines recommend cervical spine immobilization during orotracheal intubation when traumatic injury is suspected in infants. We evaluated the effect of cervical spine immobilization techniques on orotracheal intubation performance with a high-fidelity infant simulator.

METHODS:

A randomized control study with repeated measurement. Nonanesthesia pediatric practitioners certified for intubation performed 6 intubations with 3 different cervical spine immobilization techniques (no physical protection, manual in-line immobilization, and cervical collar: C-collar). Time to accomplish key actions, cervical extension angle, and observed intubation associated events such as mainstem intubation, esophageal intubation with or without immediate recognition were recorded.

RESULTS:

Twenty-six practitioners performed 156 successful orotracheal intubation. Time to intubation from end of mask assist ventilation was 29.0 +/- 12.2 seconds in no physical protection, 33.0 +/- 17.4 seconds in C-collar, and 33.0 +/- 17.1 seconds in manual in-line immobilization (P = 0.39). Maximal cervical extension angle in no physical protection (2.39 +/- 2.56 degrees ) and C-collar (2.65 +/- 1.79 degrees ) were significantly greater compared with 0.85 +/- 1.05 degrees in manual in-line immobilization (P < 0.0001). The number of intubation attempts and intubation associated events were not different among 3 techniques. Laryngeal visualization measured by Cormack-LehaneScale was more difficult in C-collar compared with other 2 techniques (P< 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS:

In this high-fidelity infant simulator model, cervical spine immobilization technique affected cervical extension angle and laryngeal visualization. Tracheal intubation associated events occurred in 33% of intubation attempts but were not different by technique. Time to achieve tracheal intubation, number of intubation attempts needed to succeed, and intubation-associated events were not affected by immobilization techniques. These results support Advanced Trauma Life Support recommendations to perform manual in-line immobilization in infants.

PMID:
18955912
DOI:
10.1097/PEC.0b013e31818c2665
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Wolters Kluwer
    Loading ...
    Support Center