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J Am Diet Assoc. 2008 Nov;108(11):1846-53. doi: 10.1016/j.jada.2008.08.009.

Diabetes risk, low fitness, and energy insufficiency levels among children from poor families.

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1
Social and Health Research Center, 1302 S St Mary's St, San Antonio, TX 78210, USA. rtrevino@sahrc.org

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Low-income populations have higher rates of type 2 diabetes and it is the hope of the investigators to increase support for the dissemination of evidence-based prevention programs aimed at children from poor families.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the prevalence of high blood glucose, obesity, low fitness, and energy insufficiency levels among children from poor families.

DESIGN:

The cross-sectional study conducted in fall 2001 used fasting capillary glucose, body mass index, body fat, step test, and three 24-hour dietary recalls to assess diabetes risk factor levels.

SUBJECTS:

Participants were 1,402 fourth-grade students aged 8 to 10 years. The racial/ethnic backgrounds were 80% Mexican American, 10% African American, 5% Asian American, and 5% non-Hispanic white.

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS PERFORMED:

All data were analyzed for descriptive statistics and frequencies of distribution. Means were computed by sex for all diabetes risk factors and t test conducted to determine differences between sexes.

RESULTS:

Nearly 75% of participants lived in households with <USD 20,400 annual income. Although 44% of students were energy insufficient, 33% were obese, and 7% had high blood glucose levels. Most of these students had marginal to unacceptable fitness levels and consumed high energy-dense and low nutrient-dense foods.

CONCLUSIONS:

Children living in poverty have high levels of diabetes risk factors and need early detection and intervention programs. Prudent advice might be to increase physical activity and intake of nutrient-dense foods rather than to restrict energy intake.

PMID:
18954574
DOI:
10.1016/j.jada.2008.08.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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