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Health Place. 2009 Jun;15(2):532-539. doi: 10.1016/j.healthplace.2008.08.008. Epub 2008 Sep 25.

Acculturation, body image, and eating behaviours in Muslim-Australian women.

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1
School of Psychology, Deakin University, 221 Burwood Highway, Melbourne 3125, Australia. Electronic address: mussap@deakin.edu.au.

Abstract

The relationship between western acculturation, body dissatisfaction, and eating behaviours was examined in a sample of 101 Muslim-Australian women between 18 and 44 years of age (M=27.3, SD=7.5). A questionnaire was completed containing measures of cultural identification (heritage and mainstream), body dissatisfaction and disordered eating (dietary control, bingeing and purging), internalization of the thin ideal, and self-esteem. A series of path analyses identified significant positive relationships between mainstream identification and the measures of body dissatisfaction and disordered eating that were mediated by thin-ideal internalization. Path analyses also identified significant negative relationships between heritage identification and the measures of body dissatisfaction and disordered eating that were mediated by self-esteem. These results are indicative of the potential risks to body image incurred by women who adopt Western values, and of the benefits in retaining heritage cultural values that promote a positive self image.

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