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J Am Coll Cardiol. 1991 Oct;18(4):904-10.

Progression of coronary atherosclerosis: is coronary spasm related to progression?

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1
Department of Cardiology, Kokura Memorial Hospital, Kitakyushu, Japan.

Abstract

A total of 239 patients undergoing serial coronary angiography with a concomitant ergonovine provocation test were studied between July 1974 and June 1987. The progression of coronary artery disease was evaluated in relation to risk factors, especially coronary artery spasm. Patients were classified into three groups: 1) new myocardial infarction group (39 patients); 2) progression without infarction group (90 patients); and 3) nonprogression group (110 patients). To assess how risk factors and coronary spasm are related to the occurrence of new myocardial infarction and progression without infarction, 11 variables in the three groups were examined: age, gender, the time interval between the studies, fasting blood sugar, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, smoking, serum cholesterol, triglyceride, uric acid and a positive response to the ergonovine provocation test. Multiple regression analysis selected three independent predictors of progression without infarction: cholesterol (p less than 0.01), systolic blood pressure (p less than 0.05) and a positive response to the ergonovine provocation test (p less than 0.001). Multiple regression analysis also selected three independent predictors of the occurrence of new myocardial infarction: fasting blood sugar (p less than 0.01), systolic blood pressure (p less than 0.05) and a positive response to the ergonovine provocation test (p less than 0.001). A positive response to the ergonovine provocation test was the strongest factor for occurrence of both new myocardial infarction and progression without infarction. To evaluate segmental arterial changes, 3,275 coronary artery segments were analyzed in the 239 patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

PMID:
1894863
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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