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J Interpers Violence. 2009 Nov;24(11):1816-34. doi: 10.1177/0886260508325496. Epub 2008 Oct 22.

Gender symmetry, sexism, and intimate partner violence.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Barnwell College, Box 41, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, USA. allenct@mailbox.sc.edu

Abstract

This study of a predominantly Hispanic sample of 92 male and 140 female college students examines both gender symmetry in intimate partner violence (IPV) and inconsistent relationships found in previous studies between sexist attitudes and IPV. Results indicate that although comparable numbers of men and women perpetrate and are victimized in their relationships with intimate partners, the path models suggest that women's violence tends to be in reaction to male violence, whereas men tend to initiate violence and then their partners respond with violence. Benevolent sexism was shown to have a protective effect against men's violence toward partners. Findings highlight the importance of studying women's violence not only in the context of men's violence but also within a broader sociocultural context.

PMID:
18945919
DOI:
10.1177/0886260508325496
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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