Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Biol Blood Marrow Transplant. 2008 Nov;14(11):1270-8. doi: 10.1016/j.bbmt.2008.08.016.

Stable long-term donor engraftment following reduced-intensity hematopoietic cell transplantation for sickle cell disease.

Author information

1
Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213, USA. krislx@chp.edu

Abstract

Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens have the potential to decrease toxicities related to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) and thus make HCT a more acceptable therapeutic option for this group of patients. We report the results of 7 patients enrolled on a study to evaluate safety and efficacy of HCT using bone marrow from an HLA matched sibling donor following an RIC regimen for patients with high-risk SCD. The conditioning regimen consisted of busulfan, fludarabine, equine antithymocyte globulin, and total lymphoid irradiation with shielding of the liver, lungs, heart, and gonads on day 1. Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis consisted of cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil. The regimen was well tolerated, and all patients had hematopoietic recovery. Six of 7 patients are stably engrafted off immunosuppression and without sickle cell-related symptoms at 2 to 8.5 years after HCT. Consistent with the complete resolution of SCD related symptoms observed in the 6 engrafted patients, erythropoiesis of complete or predominantly donor origin was detected by red blood cell-specific chimerism assays, despite their having persistent mixed chimerism in the mononuclear and lymphoid compartments. These findings demonstrate the curative potential of allogeneic HCT after an RIC regimen in patients with SCD.

PMID:
18940682
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbmt.2008.08.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center