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Calcif Tissue Int. 2008 Dec;83(6):380-7. doi: 10.1007/s00223-008-9182-x. Epub 2008 Oct 18.

Assessment of clinical risk factors to validate the probability of osteoporosis and subsequent fractures in Korean women.

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  • 1Division of Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, NHIC Ilsan Hospital, Goyang, South Korea. yoomaa@nhimc.or.kr

Abstract

This cross-sectional, observational study was designed to identify clinical risk factors of osteoporosis and fractures in Korean women to validate the probability of osteoporosis and subsequent fractures. A total of 1541 Korean women were recruited nationally. Fracture history of any site, risk factors of osteoporosis, and fall-related risk factors were surveyed and physical performance tests were conducted. Peripheral dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to measure calcaneus bone mineral density (BMD). The number of positive responses on the modified 1-min osteoporosis risk test was related to the risk of osteoporosis. The frequency of osteoporosis was higher in those with a height reduction of >4 cm and a reduced body mass index (BMI). Multivariate analysis showed that older age and lower BMI were related to higher relative risk of osteoporosis. Time required to stand up from a chair and questions related to fall injury were significantly related to clinical fracture history of any site. Multivariate analysis showed that the relative risk of fractures at any site was higher in older subjects with a lower T-score and parental hip fracture history. This study shows that age and BMI are the most significant clinical risk factors for osteoporosis and that age, BMD, and parental history of hip fracture are highly applicable risk factors for validating the probability of osteoporotic fractures in Korean women.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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