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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2008 Oct;89(10):1991-5. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2008.03.014.

Segmental spinal reflex adaptations associated with chronic ankle instability.

Author information

1
Department of Kinesiology, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849-5323, USA. jmsefton@auburn.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To further understanding of the role that segmental spinal reflexes play in chronic ankle instability (CAI).

DESIGN:

A 2 x 2 repeated-measures case-control factorial design. The independent variables were ankle group with 2 levels (healthy, CAI) and stance with 2 levels (single, double legged).

SETTING:

University research laboratory.

PARTICIPANTS:

Twenty-two participants with CAI and 21 matched healthy controls volunteered.

INTERVENTIONS:

Not applicable.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

The dependent variables were 2 measures of motoneuron pool excitability: paired reflex depression (PRD) and recurrent inhibition.

RESULTS:

A 2 x 2 repeated-measures multivariate analysis of variance revealed a significant interaction between group and stance on the linear combination of PRD and recurrent inhibition variables (Wilks lambda=.808, F(2,40)=4.77, P=.014). Follow-up univariate F tests revealed an interaction between group and stance on the PRD (F(1,41)=9.74, P=.003). Follow-up dependent t tests revealed a significant difference between single- and double-legged PRD in the healthy participants (t(20)=-3.76, P=.001) with no difference in CAI participants (t(21)=-0.44, P=.67). Finally, there was a significant difference in recurrent inhibition between healthy (mean, 83.66) and CAI (mean, 90.27) (P=.004).

CONCLUSIONS:

This study revealed that, compared with healthy participants, CAI participants were less able to modulate PRD when going from a double- to a single-legged stance. Additionally, CAI participants showed higher overall levels of recurrent inhibition when compared with healthy matched controls.

PMID:
18929028
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmr.2008.03.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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