Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Aging Ment Health. 2008 Sep;12(5):577-86. doi: 10.1080/13607860802343050.

Knowledge and beliefs about help-seeking behavior and helpfulness of interventions for Alzheimer's disease.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Federal University of Sao Paulo, UNIFESP, Sao Paulo, Brazil. blay@uol.com.br

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We investigated the lay public's attitudes toward help seeking and preferences for treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil.

METHOD:

Cross-sectional population-based random sample of 500 household residents over 18 years old participated in face-to-face interviews in Sao Paulo, which included a case vignette depicting AD and a structured questionnaire.

RESULTS:

Public opinion rests firmly in the lay support system. Psychologists and self-help groups and close relatives were often rated as helpful. Many alternative treatments (such as vitamins, physical exercise, vacation) were often rated as helpful. Limited education, younger age and experience with psychiatric problems are associated with the 'medical' intervention model. Female sex and middle age are associated with 'alternative' interventions.

CONCLUSION:

Our results suggest that attitudes and belief systems have an important impact on help-seeking and treatment recommendations.

PMID:
18855173
DOI:
10.1080/13607860802343050
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Taylor & Francis
    Loading ...
    Support Center