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Sleep. 2008 Oct;31(10):1418-21.

Lack of effects of pramipexole on REM sleep behavior disorder in Parkinson disease.

Author information

1
Neurology Service, Hospital Clinic, Institut d'Investigació Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Spain.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES:

REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a common manifestation of Parkinson disease (PD) which is characterized by dream-enacting behaviors, unpleasant dreams, and loss of muscle atonia during REM sleep. Dopaminergic mechanisms are thought to play a role in RBD pathogenesis. To further asses such a role, we have evaluated the effect of pramipexole, a dopamine receptor agonist, on RBD features in PD patients.

SETTING:

University hospital sleep disorder center.

PARTICIPANTS:

Eleven PD patients with untreated RBD. interventions: Not applicable.

MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS:

In a prospective study, 11 consecutive PD patients with untreated RBD on levodopa monotherapy were placed on pramipexole to further ameliorate their parkinsonism. The effects on RBD were evaluated before and 3 months after stable pramipexole therapy through patient and bed partner interviews and blind assessment of video-polysomnographic measures. Pramipexole improved parkinsonism in all patients. Patients and bed partners reported no significant changes in frequency and severity of the abnormal RBD related motor and vocal sleep behaviors or the frequency of unpleasant dreams. Video-polysomnography analyses showed no differences in RBD related sleep measures including tonic submental electromyographic activity, phasic submental electromyographic activity, percentage of REM sleep time spent with abnormal behaviors, and severity of the abnormal behaviors detected on the videotapes.

CONCLUSION:

In PD, pramipexole improved parkinsonism but did not modify RBD related symptoms and objective video-polysomnographic abnormalities. This observation suggests that in PD, dopamine mechanisms do not play a central role in the pathogenesis of RBD.

PMID:
18853939
PMCID:
PMC2572747
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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