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Cancer Causes Control. 2009 Mar;20(2):253-62. doi: 10.1007/s10552-008-9240-8. Epub 2008 Oct 14.

Energy balance, early life body size, and plasma prolactin levels in postmenopausal women.

Author information

1
Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 181 Longwood Ave., 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We examined the relationships of prolactin with birth weight; childhood, adolescent and adult body size measures; adult physical activity and inactivity; and alcohol consumption among 1,423 postmenopausal women from the Nurses' Health Study.

METHODS:

Information on exposures was collected on biennial questionnaires beginning in 1976. Blood was collected from 32,826 participants in 1990; prolactin was measured in a subset of women who were controls for a nested breast cancer case-control study. Generalized linear models were adjusted for assay batch, medication use at blood draw, and other potential predictors of prolactin.

RESULTS:

No associations were observed for adult factors (p-trend >or= 0.17), body mass index at age 18, birth weight, or height (p-trend >or= 0.27). There was an inverse association between body size at ages 5 (p-trend = 0.03) and 10 (p-trend = 0.05) and prolactin, with levels 9% lower among women with the heaviest versus leanest average childhood body size. This association was more pronounced among women with a birth weight <7 pounds (p-trend = 0.004; p-interaction between birth weight and childhood body size = 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results suggest that few adult lifestyle risk factors are associated with prolactin levels in postmenopausal women; however, childhood body size may be a predictor of levels later in life.

PMID:
18853263
PMCID:
PMC2681294
DOI:
10.1007/s10552-008-9240-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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