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J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2008 Sep;30(9):776-780. doi: 10.1016/S1701-2163(16)32941-3.

Acceptance of a rapid herpes test in labour: survey of attitudes of patients and health care providers.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Children's and Women's Health Centre of British Columbia, Vancouver BC.
2
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Washington, Seattle WA.
3
Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle WA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the acceptability to pregnant women and their health care providers of a rapid test for genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) in labour.

METHODS:

A cross-sectional survey was conducted with outpatient pregnant women and their health care providers (obstetricians, family physicians and midwives) at BC Women's Hospital and Health Centre.

RESULTS:

Of pregnant women approached, 207 (92%) completed the survey; 90% reported no history of genital herpes. Rapid HSV testing in labour was acceptable to 85% of pregnant women. Among the 133 women who were planning a vaginal delivery, 63% were willing to consider delivery by Caesarean section and 53% were willing to consider intrapartum anti-viral medications if HSV was present in the genital tract. Of 51 health care providers surveyed, 98% indicated interest in knowing if their patient had a newly acquired HSV infection, while 84% indicated interest in knowing if the patient had a reactivation of infection. If HSV was detected in their patient's genital tract, 36% indicated they would recommend a Caesarean section, and 25% would consider antiviral medication as an investigational intrapartum treatment. Interestingly, both of these proportions increased if the patient had ruptured membranes for more than four hours.

CONCLUSION:

Most pregnant women and their health care providers are receptive to the use of a rapid polymerase chain reaction test to detect genital HSV shedding in labour. This supports the development of HSV rapid testing and antiviral therapy trials in the labour setting.

PMID:
18845046
DOI:
10.1016/S1701-2163(16)32941-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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