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Stroke. 2008 Dec;39(12):3179-84. doi: 10.1161/STROKEAHA.108.520817. Epub 2008 Oct 2.

Increased stroke risk is related to a binge-drinking habit.

Author information

1
National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

Heavy alcohol consumption increases the risk for all strokes, whereas moderate regular alcohol consumption is associated with a lower risk for ischemic stroke. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different drinking patterns on stroke risk, independent of average alcohol intake.

METHODS:

A prospective cohort study of 15 965 Finnish men and women age 25 to 64 years who participated in a national risk factor survey and had no history of stroke at baseline were followed up for a 10-year period. The first stroke event during follow-up served as the outcome of interest (N=249 strokes). A binge drinking pattern was defined as consuming 6 or more drinks of the same alcoholic beverage in men or 4 or more drinks in women in 1 session. Cox proportional-hazards models were adjusted for average alcohol consumption, age, sex, hypertension, smoking, diabetes, body mass index, educational status, study area, study year, and history of myocardial infarction.

RESULTS:

Binge drinking was an independent risk factor for total and ischemic strokes. Compared with non-binge drinkers, the hazard ratio for total strokes among binge drinkers was 1.85 (95% CI, 1.35 to 2.54) after adjusting for average alcohol consumption, age, and sex; the association was diluted after adjustment for other risk factors. Compared with non-binge drinkers, the risk for ischemic stroke was 1.99 (95% CI, 1.39 to 2.87) among binge drinkers; the association remained statistically significant after adjustment for potential confounders.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study found that a pattern of binge drinking is an independent risk factor for all strokes and ischemic stroke.

PMID:
18832741
DOI:
10.1161/STROKEAHA.108.520817
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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