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Plant Physiol. 2008 Dec;148(4):2050-8. doi: 10.1104/pp.108.128488. Epub 2008 Oct 1.

Arabidopsis transcriptome reveals control circuits regulating redox homeostasis and the role of an AP2 transcription factor.

Author information

1
Department of Biology , Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63130, USA.

Abstract

Sensors and regulatory circuits that maintain redox homeostasis play a central role in adjusting plant metabolism and development to changing environmental conditions. We report here control networks in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) that respond to photosynthetic stress. We independently subjected Arabidopsis leaves to two commonly used photosystem II inhibitors: high light (HL) and 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU). Microarray analysis of expression patterns during the period of redox adjustment to these inhibitors reveals that 20% and 8% of the transcriptome are under HL and DCMU regulation, respectively. Approximately 6% comprise a subset of genes common to both perturbations, the redox responsive genes (RRGs). A redox network was generated in an attempt to identify genes whose expression is tightly coordinated during adjustment to homeostasis, using expression of these RRGs under HL conditions. Ten subnetworks were identified from the network. Hierarchal subclustering of subnetworks responding to the DCMU stress identified novel groups of genes that were tightly controlled while adjusting to homeostasis. Upstream analysis of the promoters of the genes in these clusters revealed different motifs for each subnetwork, including motifs that were previously identified with responses to other stresses, such as light, dehydration, or abscisic acid. Functional categorization of RRGs demonstrated involvement of genes in many metabolic pathways, including several families of transcription factors, especially those in the AP2 family. Using a T-DNA insertion in one AP2 transcription factor (redox-responsive transcription factor 1 [RRTF1]) from the RRGs, we showed that the genes predicted to be within the subnetwork containing RRTF1 were changed in this insertion line (Deltarrtf1). Furthermore, Deltarrtf1 showed greater sensitivity to photosynthetic stress compared to the wild type.

PMID:
18829981
PMCID:
PMC2593674
DOI:
10.1104/pp.108.128488
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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