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Pediatrics. 2008 Oct;122 Suppl 2:S113-20. doi: 10.1542/peds.2008-1315o.

Infant sleeping arrangements and practices during the first year of life.

Author information

1
University of Virginia School of Medicine, Department of Family Medicine, PO Box 800729, Charlottesville, VA 22908-0729, USA. frh8e@virginia.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Our goal was to examine the sleeping arrangements for infants from birth to 1 year of age and to assess the association between such arrangements and maternal characteristics.

METHODS:

Responses to the 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-month questionnaires from the Infant Feeding Practices Study II were analyzed to assess sleep arrangements, including bed sharing, the latter defined as mother ever (in a given time frame) slept with the infant on the same sleeping surface for nighttime sleep. Women were also asked about the reasons for bed sharing or not bed sharing.

RESULTS:

Approximately 2300 women responded at 3 months, and 1800 at 12 months. At 3 months, 85% of the infants slept in the same room as their mother, and at 12 months that rate was 29%. At 3 months, 26% of the mothers did not use the recommended supine position for their infant's nighttime sleep. The rate of noncompliance increased to 29% by 6 months and 36% by 12 months. The bed-sharing rates were 42% at 2 weeks, 34% at 3 months, and 27% at 12 months. Approximately two thirds of those who bed shared with their infant also shared the bed with their husband or partner, and 5% to 15% shared it with other children. The major reasons for bed sharing were to calm a fussy infant, facilitate breastfeeding, and help the infant and/or mother sleep better. The major reasons for not lying down with the infant were safety concerns. Non-Hispanic black mothers were more likely than non-Hispanic white mothers to use nonsupine infant sleep positions and to bed share.

CONCLUSIONS:

More than one third of the women in this cohort were noncompliant with safe-sleeping guidelines when their infant was 3 months old. Health care providers need to advise parents of current recommendations and discuss the risks and benefits of their choices for infant sleeping practices.

PMID:
18829826
DOI:
10.1542/peds.2008-1315o
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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