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Br J Psychiatry. 2008 Oct;193(4):279-88. doi: 10.1192/bjp.bp.108.050088.

Extrapyramidal side-effects of antipsychotics in a randomised trial.

Author information

1
University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242-1000, USA. del-miller@uiowa.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There are claims that second-generation antipsychotics produce fewer extrapyramidal side-effects (EPS) compared with first-generation drugs.

AIMS:

To compare the incidence of treatment-emergent EPS between second-generation antipsychotics and perphenazine in people with schizophrenia.

METHOD:

Incidence analyses integrated data from standardised rating scales and documented use of concomitant medication or treatment discontinuation for EPS events. Mixed model analyses of change in rating scales from baseline were also conducted.

RESULTS:

There were no significant differences in incidence or change in rating scales for parkinsonism, dystonia, akathisia or tardive dyskinesia when comparing second-generation antipsychotics with perphenazine or comparing between second-generation antipsychotics. Secondary analyses revealed greater rates of concomitant antiparkinsonism medication among individuals on risperidone and lower rates among individuals on quetiapine, and lower rates of discontinuation because of parkinsonism among people on quetiapine and ziprasidone. There was a trend for a greater likelihood of concomitant medication for akathisia among individuals on risperidone and perphenazine.

CONCLUSIONS:

The incidence of treatment-emergent EPS and change in EPS ratings indicated that there are no significant differences between second-generation antipsychotics and perphenazine or between second-generation antipsychotics in people with schizophrenia.

PMID:
18827289
PMCID:
PMC2801816
DOI:
10.1192/bjp.bp.108.050088
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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