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BMC Med Educ. 2008 Sep 30;8:45. doi: 10.1186/1472-6920-8-45.

Development of a food allergy education resource for primary care physicians.

Author information

1
Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. joyce.yu@mssm.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Food allergy is estimated to affect 3-4% of adults in the US, but there are limited educational resources for primary care physicians. The goal of this study was to develop and pilot a food allergy educational resource based upon a needs survey of non-allergist healthcare providers.

METHODS:

A survey was undertaken to identify educational needs and preferences for providers, with a focus on physicians caring for adults and teenagers, including emergency medicine providers. The results of the survey were used to develop a teaching program that was subsequently piloted on primary care and emergency medicine physicians. Knowledge base tests and satisfaction surveys were administered to determine the effectiveness of the educational program.

RESULTS:

Eighty-two physicians (response rate, 65%) completed the needs assessment survey. Areas of deficiency and educational needs identified included: identification of potentially life-threatening food allergies, food allergy diagnosis, and education of patients about treatment (food avoidance and epinephrine use). Small group, on-site training was the most requested mode of education. A slide set and narrative were developed to address the identified needs. Twenty-six separately enrolled participants were administered the teaching set. Pre-post knowledge base scores increased from a mean of 38% correct to 64% correct (p < 0.001). Ability to correctly demonstrate the use of epinephrine self injectors increased significantly. Nearly all participants (>95%) indicated that the teaching module increased their comfort with recognition and management of food allergy.

CONCLUSION:

Our pilot food allergy program, developed based upon needs assessments, showed strong participant satisfaction and educational value.

PMID:
18826650
PMCID:
PMC2569928
DOI:
10.1186/1472-6920-8-45
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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