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J Neurosci Methods. 2009 Jan 30;176(2):129-35. doi: 10.1016/j.jneumeth.2008.08.033. Epub 2008 Sep 9.

PET measurement of changes in D2/D3 dopamine receptor binding in a nonhuman primate during chronic deep brain stimulation of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis.

Author information

1
University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Medical Physics, United States.

Abstract

PET imaging is a powerful tool for measuring physiological changes in the brain during deep brain stimulation (DBS). In this work, we acquired five PET scans using a highly selective D2/D3 dopamine antagonist, 18F-fallypride, to track changes in dopamine receptor availability, as measured by the distribution volume ratio (DVR), through the course of DBS in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) in a nonhuman primate.

METHODS:

PET scans were performed on a rhesus monkey with unilateral BNST stimulation during periods of baseline, chronic high frequency (130 Hz) and low frequency (50 Hz) DBS stimulation, and during a washout period between stimulation periods. A final scan was performed with the electrode stimulation starting 110 min into the scan. Whole brain parametric images of (18)F-fallypride DVR were calculated for each condition to track changes in both striatal and extrastriatal D2/D3 availability.

RESULTS:

The monkey displayed significant increases in receptor binding throughout the brain during DBS relative to baseline for 130 and 50 Hz, with changes in DVR of: caudate 42%, 51%; putamen 56%, 57%; thalamus 33%, 49%; substantia nigra 29%, 26%; and prefrontal cortex 28%, 56%, respectively. Washout and post-stimulation scans revealed DVR values close to baseline values. Activating the stimulator midway through the final scan resulted in no statistically significant changes in binding.

CONCLUSIONS:

PET neuroligand imaging has demonstrated the sensitivity to track changes in dopamine D2/D3 binding during the course of DBS. These methods show great potential for providing insight into the neurochemical consequences of DBS.

PMID:
18824196
PMCID:
PMC2638170
DOI:
10.1016/j.jneumeth.2008.08.033
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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