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JAMA. 2008 Sep 24;300(12):1417-22. doi: 10.1001/jama.300.12.1417.

Prevalence of colon polyps detected by colonoscopy screening in asymptomatic black and white patients.

Author information

1
Division of Gastroenterology, Portland VA Medical Center, 1037SW Veterans Hospital Rd, P3-GI, Portland, OR 97239, USA. lieberma@ohsu.edu

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Compared with white individuals, black men and women have a higher incidence and mortality from colorectal cancer and may develop cancer at a younger age. Colorectal cancer screening might be less effective in black individuals, if there are racial differences in the age-adjusted prevalence and location of cancer precursor lesions.

OBJECTIVES:

To determine and compare the prevalence rates and location of polyps sized more than 9 mm in diameter in asymptomatic black and white individuals who received colonoscopy screening.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS:

Colonoscopy data were prospectively collected from 67 adult gastrointestinal practice sites in the United States using a computerized endoscopic report generator between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2005. Data were transmitted to a central data repository, where all asymptomatic white (n = 80 061) and black (n = 5464) patients who had received screening colonoscopy were identified.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Prevalence and location of polyps sized more than 9 mm, adjusted for age, sex, and family history of colorectal cancer in a multivariate analysis.

RESULTS:

Both black men and women had a higher prevalence of polyps sized more than 9 mm in diameter compared with white men and women (422 [7.7%] vs 4964 [6.2%]; P < .001). Compared with white patients, the adjusted odds ratio (OR) for black men was 1.16 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.34) and the adjusted OR for black women was 1.62 (95% CI, 1.39-1.89). Black and white patients had a similar risk of proximal polyps sized more than 9 mm (OR, 1.13;95% CI, 0.93-1.38). However, in a subanalysis of patients older than 60 years, proximal polyps sized more than 9 mm were more likely prevalent in black men (P = .03) and women (P < .001) compared with white men and women.

CONCLUSION:

Compared with white individuals, black men and women undergoing screening colonoscopy have a higher risk of polyps sized more than 9 mm, and black individuals older than 60 years are more likely to have proximal polyps sized more than 9 mm.

PMID:
18812532
PMCID:
PMC3878153
DOI:
10.1001/jama.300.12.1417
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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