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Life Sci. 2008 Oct 24;83(17-18):581-8. doi: 10.1016/j.lfs.2008.08.011. Epub 2008 Sep 6.

Effects of oral consumption of the green tea polyphenol EGCG in a murine model for human Sjogren's syndrome, an autoimmune disease.

Author information

1
Department of Periodontology, US Army Fort Gordon, Fort Gordon, GA, USA.

Abstract

SIGNIFICANCE:

Protection of glandular cells from autoimmune-induced damage would be of significant clinical benefit to Sjogren's syndrome (SS) patients. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) possesses anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and autoantigen-inhibitory properties.

AIMS:

To investigate if EGCG protects against certain autoimmune-induced pathological changes in the salivary glands of the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model for SS.

MAIN METHODS:

Animals were provided with either water or water containing 0.2% EGCG. At the age of 8, 16 and 22 weeks, submandibular salivary gland tissue and serum samples were collected for pathological and serological analysis.

KEY FINDINGS:

Significant lymphocyte infiltration was observed in the salivary glands of the water-fed group at the age of 16 weeks, while the EGCG group showed reduced lymphocyte infiltration. By 22 weeks of age, water-fed animals demonstrated elevated levels of apoptotic activity within the lymphocytic infiltrates, and high levels of serum total anti-nuclear antibody, compared to EGCG-fed animals. Remarkably, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and Ki-67 levels in the salivary glands of water-fed NOD mice were significantly elevated in comparison to BALB/c control mice; in contrast, PCNA and Ki-67 levels in EGCG-fed NOD animals were similar to BALB/c mice. These results indicate that EGCG protects the NOD mouse submandibular glands from autoimmune-induced inflammation, and reduces serum autoantibody levels. Abnormal proliferation, rather than apoptosis, appears to be a characteristic of the NOD mouse gland that is normalized by EGCG. The evidence suggests that EGCG could be useful in delaying or managing SS-like autoimmune disorders.

PMID:
18809413
PMCID:
PMC2701648
DOI:
10.1016/j.lfs.2008.08.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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