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J Appl Psychol. 2008 Sep;93(5):1165-73. doi: 10.1037/0021-9010.93.5.1165.

Blinded by anger or feeling the love: how emotions influence advice taking.

Author information

1
Tepper School of Business, Carnegie Mellon University. fgino@andrew.cmu.edu

Abstract

Across 2 experiments, the authors demonstrate that emotional states influence how receptive people are to advice. The focus of these experiments is on incidental emotions, emotions triggered by a prior experience that is irrelevant to the current situation. The authors demonstrate that people who feel incidental gratitude are more trusting and more receptive to advice than are people in a neutral emotional state, and people in a neutral state are more trusting and more receptive to advice than are people who feel incidental anger. In these experiments, greater receptivity to advice increased judgment accuracy. People who felt incidental gratitude were more accurate than were people in a neutral state, and people in a neutral state were more accurate than were people who felt incidental anger. The results offer insight into how people use advice, and the authors identify conditions under which leaders, policy makers, and advisors may be particularly influential.

PMID:
18808234
DOI:
10.1037/0021-9010.93.5.1165
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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