Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Metabolism. 2008 Oct;57 Suppl 2:S11-5. doi: 10.1016/j.metabol.2008.07.006.

Understanding the potency of stressful early life experiences on brain and body function.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10065, USA. mcewen@rockefeller.edu

Abstract

Early life experiences have powerful effects on the brain and body lasting throughout the entire life span and influencing brain function, behavior, and the risk for a number of systemic and mental disorders. Animal models of early life adversity are providing mechanistic insights, including glimpses into the fascinating world that is now called "epigenetics" as well as the role of naturally occurring alleles of a number of genes. These studies also provide insights into the adaptive value as well as the negative consequences, of early life stress, exposure to novelty, and poor-quality vs good-quality maternal care. Animal models begin to provide a mechanistic basis for understanding how brain development and physiological functioning is affected in children exposed to early life abuse and neglect, where there is a burgeoning literature on the consequences for physical health and emotional and cognitive development. An important goal is to identify interventions that are likely to be most effective in early life and some guidelines are provided.

PMID:
18803958
PMCID:
PMC2567059
DOI:
10.1016/j.metabol.2008.07.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center