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BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2008 Sep 15;8:39. doi: 10.1186/1472-6947-8-39.

Hospital characteristics associated with highly automated and usable clinical information systems in Texas, United States.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, UT Southwestern Medical Center and Parkland Health & Hospital System, Dallas, USA. ramara@parknet.pmh.org

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

A hospital's clinical information system may require a specific environment in which to flourish. This environment is not yet well defined. We examined whether specific hospital characteristics are associated with highly automated and usable clinical information systems.

METHODS:

This was a cross-sectional survey of 125 urban hospitals in Texas, United States using the Clinical Information Technology Assessment Tool (CITAT), which measures a hospital's level of automation based on physician interactions with the information system. Physician responses were used to calculate a series of CITAT scores: automation and usability scores, four automation sub-domain scores, and an overall clinical information technology (CIT) score. A multivariable regression analysis was used to examine the relation between hospital characteristics and CITAT scores.

RESULTS:

We received a sufficient number of physician responses at 69 hospitals (55% response rate). Teaching hospitals, hospitals with higher IT operating expenses (>$1 million annually), IT capital expenses (>$75,000 annually) and hospitals with larger IT staff (> or = 10 full-time staff) had higher automation scores than hospitals that did not meet these criteria (p < 0.05 in all cases). These findings held after adjustment for bed size, total margin, and ownership (p < 0.05 in all cases). There were few significant associations between the hospital characteristics tested in this study and usability scores.

CONCLUSION:

Academic affiliation and larger IT operating, capital, and staff budgets are associated with more highly automated clinical information systems.

PMID:
18793426
PMCID:
PMC2553406
DOI:
10.1186/1472-6947-8-39
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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