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Srp Arh Celok Lek. 2008 May-Jun;136(5-6):262-6.

[Hashimoto's thyroiditis in children and adolescents].

[Article in Serbian]

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) is a common cause of goitre and hypothyroidism in children and adolescents. Spontaneous remission may occur in up to 50% patients, but the development of hypothyroidism is possible.

OBJECTIVE:

We investigated the clinical manifestations, course and long-term outcome of HT.

METHOD:

We reviewed charts of 43 children (36 females) with HT, mean age at presentation 12.3 years, and mean follow-up duration 4.6 years.

RESULTS:

HT is five times more common in females. The common complaints leading to referral were goitre in 19 children (44.3%), diffuse in 17 children (89.5%). As to the prevalence of goitre, it accounted for significantly more referrals in females (14 girls, and 5 boys; 73.7% vs 26.3%, t-test; p < 0.005). Goitre was either isolated in 15 (34.4%) or associated with other complaints in 4 children: anaemia in 7 (16.2%), fatigue in 5 (11.8%), increased appetite in 4 (9.7%), weight gain in 3 (7.0%), growth retardation in 2 children (4.7%), at irregular menses in 3 pubertal girls. Hypothyroidism was present in 18 patients (41.1%), 7 (38.8%) on initial admission, and 11 (61.8%) had the mean follow-up duration of 4.6 years. There were 25 euthyroid HT patients (59.9%). The family history of the thyroid disease was positive in 16 children (37.1%) and 12 of them (71.4%) had hypothyroidism. There were 6 patients (13.9%) in whom the disease was associated with some other autoimmune disease.

CONCLUSION:

HT is five times more common in females. The usual complaints leading to referral were diffuse goitre, which accounted for significantly more referrals in females. A positive family history of autoimmune thyroid disease is associated with a higher risk of hypothyroidism in children with HT. Hypothyroid patients may appear in higher percentage of children and adolescents than previously reported.

PMID:
18792623
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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