Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Int J Antimicrob Agents. 2008 Dec;32(6):511-4. doi: 10.1016/j.ijantimicag.2008.05.023. Epub 2008 Sep 13.

Activity of voriconazole, itraconazole, fluconazole and amphotericin B in vitro against 1763 yeasts from 472 patients in the voriconazole phase III clinical studies.

Author information

1
Health Protection Agency, Kingsdown, Bristol, UK.

Abstract

The susceptibility of 1763 yeast isolates (from 22 species and seven genera) was tested using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute M27-A2 microdilution methodology. Candida spp. predominated (97.1%), mainly C. albicans (51.4%), C. glabrata (16.4%) and C. tropicalis (13.7%), followed by Trichosporon spp. (1.1%) and Cryptococcus neoformans (1.0%). Most isolates came from blood/catheters (72.0%) or the oesophagus/oropharynx (11.3%). The voriconazole, itraconazole, fluconazole and amphotericin B MIC90 values (minimum inhibitory concentration for 90% of the isolates) for all isolates were 1.0, 2.0, 64 and 1.0 microg/mL, respectively. Voriconazole MICs correlated with those for fluconazole (r = 0.91) and itraconazole (r = 0.90). Only 109 isolates (6.2%) had voriconazole MICs > or = 4.0 microg/mL; all were C. albicans, C. glabrata or C. tropicalis resistant to itraconazole (and most to fluconazole). Isolates from 22 patients with amphotericin MICs > or = 2.0 microg/mL (range 2.0-16.0 microg/mL) were also cross-resistant to one or more of the triazoles. Patients (n = 34) with voriconazole-resistant isolates showed a 56% response to voriconazole therapy, and those patients (n = 261) with susceptible isolates showed a 71% response. Twenty-three voriconazole-treated patients had baseline resistant isolates, in eight patients voriconazole resistance developed during therapy and in three patients a different resistant species arose during therapy. Thus, voriconazole MICs correlate with those of fluconazole and itraconazole and may predict clinical outcome.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center