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BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2008 Sep 10;8:41. doi: 10.1186/1471-2393-8-41.

A population-based study of effect of multiple birth on infant mortality in Nigeria.

Author information

1
Center for Evidence-Based Global Health, Ilorin, Kwara State, Nigeria. uthlekan@yahoo.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Multi-foetal pregnancies and multiple births including twins and higher order multiples births such as triplets and quadruplets are high-risk pregnancy and birth. These high-risk groups contribute to the higher rate of childhood mortality especially during early period of life.

METHODS:

We examined the relationship between multiple births and infant mortality using univariable and multivariable survival regression procedure with Weibull hazard function, controlling for child's sex, birth order, prenatal care, delivery assistance; mother's age at child birth, nutritional status, education level; household living conditions and several other risk factors.

RESULTS:

Children born multiple births were more than twice as likely to die during infancy as infants born singleton (hazard ratio = 2.19; 95% confidence interval: 1.50, 3.19) holding other factors constant. Maternal education and household asset index were associated with lower risk of infant mortality.

CONCLUSION:

Multiple births are strongly negatively associated with infant survival in Nigeria independent of other risk factors. Mother's education played a protective role against infant death. This evidence suggests that improving maternal education may be key to improving child survival in Nigeria. A well-educated mother has a better chance of satisfying important factors that can improve infant survival: the quality of infant feeding, general care, household sanitation, and adequate use of preventive and curative health services.

PMID:
18783603
PMCID:
PMC2551580
DOI:
10.1186/1471-2393-8-41
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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