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Addiction. 2008 Sep;103(9):1521-33. doi: 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2008.02275.x.

Psychological mediators of bupropion sustained-release treatment for smoking cessation.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Rutgers-The State University of New Jersey, 152 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA. demccart@rci.rutgers.edu

Abstract

AIM:

The study aimed to test simultaneously our understanding of the effects of bupropion sustained-release (SR) treatment on putative mediators and our understanding of determinants of post-quit abstinence, including withdrawal distress, cigarette craving, positive affect and subjective reactions to cigarettes smoked during a lapse. The specificity of bupropion SR effects was also tested in exploratory analyses.

DESIGN:

Data from a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial of bupropion SR were submitted to mediation analyses.

SETTING:

Center for Tobacco Research and Intervention, Madison, WI, USA.

PARTICIPANTS:

A total of 403 adult, daily smokers without contraindications to bupropion SR use.

INTERVENTION:

Participants were assigned randomly to receive a 9-week course of bupropion SR or placebo pill and to receive eight brief individual counseling sessions or no counseling.

MEASUREMENTS:

Ecological momentary assessment ratings of smoking behavior and putative mediators were collected pre- and post-quit.

FINDINGS:

Results of structural equation and hierarchical linear models did not support the hypothesis that bupropion SR treatment improves short-term abstinence by reducing withdrawal distress or affecting the subjective effects of a lapse cigarette, but provided partial support for mediation by cigarette craving reduction and enhanced positive affect. Bupropion SR effects on point-prevalence abstinence at 1 month post-quit were also mediated partially by enhanced motivation to quit and self-efficacy.

CONCLUSIONS:

Results provided some support for models of bupropion SR treatment and relapse and suggested that motivational processes may partially account for bupropion SR efficacy.

PMID:
18783504
PMCID:
PMC2879164
DOI:
10.1111/j.1360-0443.2008.02275.x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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