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PLoS One. 2008 Sep 9;3(9):e3172. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0003172.

Elevated systemic antibodies towards commensal gut microbiota in autoinflammatory condition.

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1
Institute of Molecular Biology, National Academy of Sciences, Yerevan, Armenia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autoinflammatory condition, which is characterized by acute, self-limiting episodes of fever and serositis and chronic subclinical inflammation in remission. Here we investigated the consequence of this condition on the level of systemic antibodies directed towards common intestinal bacteria.

METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS:

The level of systemic antibodies towards the antigens of Bacteroides, Parabacteroides, Escherichia, Enteroccocus and Lactobaccilus was measured by ELISA in FMF patients at various stages of the disease and in healthy controls. The difference between remission and attack was not significant. IgG antibodies against the antigens of Bacteroides, Parabacteroides, Escherichia and Enteroccocus were significantly increased in FMF compared to control while IgA levels were not significantly affected. Western blot analyses demonstrated the IgG reactivity against multiple antigens of commensal bacteria in FMF. Serological expression cloning was performed to identify these antigens. No single dominant antigen was identified; the response was generalized and directed against a variety of proteins from Bacteroides, Parabacteroides, Escherichia, and other gut commensals.

CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE:

This autoinflammatory syndrome is characterized by the increased systemic reactivity against commensal gut microbiota. This is probably the consequence of hypersensitivity of the inflammasome in FMF that triggers the inflammation and contributes to the excessive translocation of bacteria and bacterial antigens through the gut barrier.

PMID:
18779861
PMCID:
PMC2525839
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0003172
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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