Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon). 2008 Dec;23(10):1260-8. doi: 10.1016/j.clinbiomech.2008.07.011. Epub 2008 Sep 6.

Gender differences in walking and running on level and inclined surfaces.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, Physical Therapy Program, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI 53706-1532, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Gender differences in kinematics during running have been speculated to be a contributing factor to the lower extremity injury rate disparity between men and women. Specifically, increased non-sagittal motion of the pelvis and hip has been implicated; however it is not known if this difference exists under a variety of locomotion conditions. The purpose of this study was to characterize gender differences in gait kinematics and muscle activities as a function of speed and surface incline and to determine if lower extremity anthropometrics contribute to these differences.

METHODS:

Whole body kinematics of 34 healthy volunteers were recorded along with electromyography of muscles on the right lower limb while each subject walked at 1.2, 1.5, and 1.8m/s and ran at 1.8, 2.7, and 3.6m/s with surface inclinations of 0%, 10%, and 15% grade. Joint angles and muscle activities were compared between genders across each speed-incline condition. Pelvis and lower extremity segment lengths were also measured and compared.

FINDINGS:

Females displayed greater peak hip internal rotation and adduction, as well as gluteus maximus activity for all conditions. Significant interactions (speed-gender, incline-gender) were present for the gluteus medius and vastus lateralis. Hip adduction during walking was moderately correlated to the ratio of bi-trochanteric width to leg length.

INTERPRETATION:

Our findings indicate females display greater non-sagittal motion. Future studies are needed to better define the relationship of these differences to injury risk.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center